The Elf Name Generator

Your Sindarin Elf Name

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About The Sindarin Elf Name Generator

About The Sindarin Elf Name Generator

Immerse yourself in the world of J.R.R. Tolkien and The Lord of the Rings by creating a distinctive elf name with our Sindarin elf name generator! Using the original Sindarin language developed by Tolkien himself, our generator lets you create a name that's either random, or specifically based on your own name, and you can also choose from lists of themed names. You can use it for a distinctive screen name on a forum or social media, for a tabletop role-playing game or MMORPG like World of Warcraft, or just to add a little mysticism and magic to your day!

Sindarin is spoken by Tolkien's elves in 'contemporary' Middle-Earth as portrayed in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, and it's a very complex language. The generator that I have designed can make many different names that follow Tolkien's linguistic rules, and includes the translations and meanings of each name from Sindarin. The language also has lots of quirks, and there are a number of different naming conventions depending on both gender and age.

There are a handful of elf name generators around already, but we couldn't find one that gave the option of creating both random names and user-unique names, as well as being purely based on Sindarin. We used the Sindarin elf name lists on realelvish.com with many thanks due, along with a few other sources of Sindarin language to create the generator. There are over 800 different prefixes alone, and that's before we even get onto the complicated gender/age/relationship based suffixes! It took well over two weeks to write this name generator, and I hope the results will be acceptable to all the die-hard LOTR Sindarin enthusiasts out there!

The Creation of Sindarin

J.R.R. Tolkien's fantasy world originally developed from his interest in languages. During his teens (1902–1912), he began inventing fictional languages and from this he also started to create a secondary world where these languages would originate from. The first building blocks of the Sindarin language would first turn up in a language Tolkien created when he was 23, in 1915 – Goldogrin, or 'Gnomish', where gnomes were one of the imagined clans of the elves.

Tolkien wrote a fairly significant dictionary and grammatical rules for the Goldogrin language, and used it when writing the earliest stories relating to Middle-Earth's history that were eventually collected together into The Book of Lost Tales. He then evolved the language significantly ten years later in 1925 when he created Noldorin (using a word from the Quenya elvish language). Noldorin evolved further in the early 1930s alongside other elvish languages like Ilkorin speech of the Elves of the Third Age. Many of Tolkien's languages were designed to show the way language can evolve – for example, Noldorin was originally conceived as having grown from the language spoken by the elves in Valinor, the Undying Lands from which they originally hailed.

The Sindarin language itself was created by Tolkien in 1944, while he was working directly on writing The Lord of the Rings. Tolkien took the Noldorin language and blended it with one of the Ilkorin languages he had previously developed, combining them with a heavy influence from certain syllables and sounds from the Welsh language. Tolkien's intention was to mirror the way that modern Welsh evolved from the ancient Celtic language, and the relationship between Sindarin and the 'elder' language Quenya was meant to echo the differences between Welsh and Latin. (By this time, Tolkien had designated the elvish language Quenya as used primarily for either poetry or ritual, in the same manner as Latin.)

While Tolkien wrote a number of small works in Sindarin, he never intended for Sindarin to be a fully functional language used in everyday life. He deliberately kept certain areas of the language vague and did not include a full grammar or dictionary in the appendices of The Lord of the Rings because he felt it would interfere with the narrative, preferring to keep certain smaller aspects of his fantasy world building hidden or unclear to aid 'verisimilitude'. Across his life, Tolkien produced a massive amount of material on the linguistics of his invented languages, and this material is still gradually being published many years after his death by small-press magazines like Vinyar Tengwar and Parma Eldalamberon. The fact that Tolkien kept certain aspects of Sindarin vague meant that when it came to making the Lord of the Rings film trilogy, in order to create the specific Elvish dialogue, a linguist named David Salo was hired to essentially fill in the blanks and write fully functional dialogue in Sindarin that would still follow as many of Tolkien's rules as possible.

Please note: this is a fan commentary page intended to encourage interest in Tolkien's works. The Sindarin elf name generator is not an official publication and is not in any way affiliated with or endorsed by the estate of J.R.R. Tolkien or Tolkien Enterprises, or any of their licensees. Copyrights and trademarks for the books, films, articles and other promotional materials are held by their respective owners and their quotation is allowed under the fair use clause of copyright law. Sindarin is a highly extensive language which many fan sources have added to over time. A very small amount of the Sindarin language is quoted here under fair use. The extremely limited quotation of Tolkien's works is in no way intended to harm or undermine the market value of those works, rather to encourage fans to engage with and seek out those works.

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